American Traditional Head Tattoos:

Head tattoos are a bold statement to say the least. Whether you decide to let your hair grow out again, or rock the tattooed head 24/7. For such a bold placement, one needs a bold design.

American traditional tattoos are known for being bold as hell. Check out these trad head tattoos and get inspired!

Alex Snelgrove
Trad blackwork with some classic dice, reaper’s scythe, and chains. Done by Alex Snelgrove.
Bertz at Skingdom Tattoo
Snakey done by Bertz at Skingdom Tattoo.
Chris Anthon at Grand River Tattoo Company in St. Elora Ontario
Snake popping out the back of the neck done by Chris Anthon at Grand River Tattoo Company in St. Elora in Ontario.
Dane Soos 1
Snake and yellow roses done by Dane Soos.
Dane Soos
Blackwork mandala also done by Dane Soos.
David Bruehl in Tampa Florida
Rose and claw done by David Bruehl in Tampa, Florida.
Eugene at Chapel Tattoo
Pristine scorpion done by Eugene at Chapel Tattoo.
Franz Stefanik at The Okey Doke Tattoo Shop
Classic eagle and snake done by Franz Stefanik at The Okey Doke Tattoo Shop in Toronto.
Gonzalo Muñiz at Last port Tattoo
Pharaoh’s horses and web background done by Gonzalo Muñiz at Last Port Tattoo.
Gordon Combs Til Death in Denver and Art Work Rebels in Portland
Eagle head done by Gordon Combs at Til Death Tattoo in Denver and Art Work Rebels in Portland.
Han Shinko in Essen
Blackwork skeleton hand and leaves done by Han Shinko in Essen, Germany.
Jaca in Hossegor, France.
Blackwork eagle and skull done by Jaca in Hossegor, France.
Joshua Marks in Los Angeles
Lil’ butterfly done by Joshua Marks in Los Angeles.
Mando Islas in California
Some trad filler done by Mando Islas in California.
Martina at Pretty Electric Tattoo
Cute bird and flowers in some nice bright colours done by Martina at Pretty Electric Tattoo.
Matt Andersson in Gothenburg
Bold ship design done by Matt Andersson in Gothenburg.
Nate Kemr
Blackwork church and webs by Nate Kemr.
Nick Mayes at North Sea Tattoo, Scarborough, UK
Panther head done by Nick Mayes at North Sea Tattoo, Scarborough, UK.
Paulo da Butcher at Impact Custom Tattoo
Eagle and skull done by Paulo da Butcher at Impact Custom Tattoo.
Zach Nelligan at Mainstay Tattoo in Austin TX
Cross, snake, skull, and flowers done by Zach Nelligan at Mainstay Tattoo in Austin Texas.

Which head piece is your favourite?

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Jason Voorhees Tattoos:

Jason Voorhees is the iconic villain from the Friday the 13th franchise. Jason is a silent, undead killing machine, and mamma’s boy. Jason haunts Camp Crystal Lake where he drowned as a child due to inattentive lifeguards. As a tattoo Jason is done in a realistic style portrait, American traditional style, neo traditional, black and grey, and new school/cartoon. He is usually seen wearing his hockey mask, sometimes paired with his machete or other weapons, or seen in Camp Crystal Lake.

DJ at True Color Tattoos
Jason mask with full bodied Jason in very dark tones done by DJ at True Color Tattoos.
Paul Acker The Séance Tattoo Parlor in Bensalem PA
Hyper realistic Jason in a killing position done by Paul Acker The Séance Tattoo Parlor in Bensalem PA.
Joe K Worrall at Heart & Arrow Tattoo Studio, U.K
Colour piece by Joe K Worrall at Heart & Arrow Tattoo Studio in the UK.
Matt Beirne at Stefano's Tattoo Studio in Ft. Lauderdale
Black and grey Jason at Camp Crystal Lake with nude camp counsellor by Matt Beirne at Stefano’s Tattoo Studio in Ft. Lauderdale.
Moira Ramone at 24 to Life in NL.
Great contrasted Jason mask and machete by Moira Ramone at 25 to Life Tattoo in NL.

Jason was born with facial deformities and a mental disability. His mother kept him away from other people, homeschooling him and looking after him herself, but when she was unable to find a babysitter she resorted to sending him to Camp Crystal Lake where she worked as the cook. Jason was bullied by the other kids and thrown into the lake where he drowned while the counsellors were having sex in the woods. Mad with grief, Pamela, Jason’s mother, murdered the counsellors she blamed for Jason’s death. Jason came back to life and waited for his mother to come back to him, for 20 years. Years later the camp tried to re open, but Pamela murdered all but one of the counsellors. The survivor, Alice, cut off her head, while Jason watched. Jason killed anyone who came back to the camp, mostly using the machete that killed his own mother.

Alessia at Bikini Bottom Tattoo Shop
Adorable cartoon Jason done by Alessia at Bikini Bottom Tattoo shop.
Fran Muñoz
Realistic black and grey Jason head and chain by Fran Muñoz.
Megan Fell
American traditional Jason mask with “mamma’s boy” and flower by Megan Fell.

Jason has a kill count of over 150 throughout the films he’s been in. Jason’s supernatural powers include immortality, regeneration, superhuman strength, enhanced speed, and durability.

Amanda Fox in Glasgow
Jason mask and machete’s in classic skull and crossbones fashion by Amanda Fox in Glasgow.
Jesse Torres
Mostly black and grey Jason mask by Jesse Torres.
Murrmosavich at Blue Blood Custom Tattoos
Blackwork mask and machete by Murrmosavich at Blue Blood Custom Tattoos.
Sabrina Sawyers
Blackwork Jason mask and trees by Sabrina Sawyers.

Jason is a fan favorite in the horror genre, often paired with Freddy Kreuger, due in part to the film Freddy VS. Jason.

Done at Bespoke Body Art Tattoos in Grimsby, UK
Jason’s torso and machete, with chains, done at Bespoke Body Art Tattoos in Grimsby, UK.
Matt Bishop at Artistic Edge Tattoo
Neo traditional Jason and Camp Crystal Lake tattoo by Matt Bishop at Artistic Edge Tattoo.
Tony Davis in VA.
“Mama tried” American traditional mask and flower by Tony Davis in VA.

What is your favorite Friday the 13th movie?

 

Tattoo History 6: The Circus/Sideshow and Tattoos

Tattoos were an important part of the sideshow in circuses and carnivals from the end of the 1800’s and into the early 1900’s. Though tattoos didn’t become an integral part of the circus until this later time, tattoos in the circus originated around 1804 (approximately) when Jean Baptiste Cabri (also seen as Kabri) who had been tattooed by the Marquesas in the Pacifics joined a carnival. Jean was a French deserter who fled to the Pacific Islands and lived there with his wife whom he met and married there. He acquired a large number of tattoos while there, all of which had a specific meaning. His tattoos were a mark of entering manhood, and meant that he had been fully accepted as one of the islanders. Jean was discovered on the island by Russian explorers, and after some convincing, went back with them to Europe to tour in a carnival as a heavily tattooed man.

tattoo Jean Baptiste Cabri
Jean Baptiste Cabri

The first tattooed man to be apart of the circus in America was named James F. O’Connell. James was an important part of Barnum’s circus in 1842, specifically in the “freak show”. James was tattooed head to toe in tribal Polynesian style during his time as a prisoner on the Caroline Islands in the South Pacific. James became shipwrecked on the islands and lived apparently by dancing Irish jigs to entertain the local islanders. He was then forcibly tattooed over a period of eight days, and even forced to marry one of the women who tattooed him. After about 5 years on the island another ship finally landed and brought him back to America where he started life in the circus as the first tattooed man in America to be part of the show.

tattoo James F. O'Connell
James F. O’Connell

After O’Connell, a Greek man nicknamed Prince Constantine, and also Captain Constentenus quickly became immensely popular in 1873 due to his extremely heavily tattooed body which at this time was rarely seen. His tattoos covered his hands, neck and face.He reportedly had 388 tattoos. He may have been the most popular and wealthy tattooed circus member of this time, bringing in around one hundred dollar US a week, which was a lot of money for this time. His tattoos included hundreds of animals and small filler pieces all over his body, tattooed over a period of three months with three hours of tattooing being done every morning.

tattoo captain Costentenus
Captain Constentenus/ Prince Constantine

Women also had their place in the circus world of tattoos. Nora Hildebrandt is known as the first tattooed woman to earn a living based on her ink. Nora had an elaborate (but untrue) story of how she got her tattoos. To attract more attention, she claimed that her tattoos were forcibly done on her by “savage Lakota Indians” when in reality she was born in London, and tattooed by her common law husband Martin Hildebrandt. Some thought Martin was her father or her actual husband, but according to numerous sources it looks as though Nora was not actually related to Martin. Martin was one of the first (if not the first) permanent tattoo artist in America, tattooing in New York after tattooing soldiers in the civil war and travelling with the Navy. At just 25 years old Nora was able to make a career for herself in the circus business starting in 1882. Nora is most famous for being in the Barnum and Bailey’s Circus in New York.

tattoo Nora Hildebrandt
Nora Hildebrandt

Women quickly became the more popular option of viewing when it came to seeing tattooed people, as seeing a woman showing skin at this time was scandalous and unheard of. Naturally this alone drew crowds. In the 1920’s one of the more head-turning women in the circus was a woman called Lady Viola. Lady Viola was very popular in part due to her often being known as “The most beautiful tattooed woman in the world” as well as her unique tattoos, some of which were early portrait work of well known people such as Charlie Chaplin, Tom Mix, and presidents Wilson, Washington, and Lincoln across her chest.

tattoo lady viola
Lady Viola

For around 70 years or so, every big circus employed tattooed people as part of the act, showcasing them as freaks or acts just because of their ink, and as part of other acts such as juggling, feats of strength, sword swallowing, fire breathing, and more. Tattooed people made good money travelling with a circus as different circuses had rivalries with each other, so these people could get the best pay from those who wanted them badly enough. Tattoo artists could also make a good living by either travelling with a circus or setting up shop in a location where lots of circuses stopped.

tattoo sideshow banner by Fred G. Johnson
Circus banner by Fred G. Johnson

While tattoos in the circus remained a popular staple in this form of entertainment (even today), they did lose some of their mystery and novelty around the early 1900’s with the invention of the modern electric tattoo machine. Thanks to this machine more and more people were getting tattooed. In order to keep people interested circuses had to step it up a notch. This was done by presenting whole families of tattooed people, tattooed dwarves, motorcycle riders, and even tattooed animals.

tattoo tattooed family
Tattooed family

Popular circus tattoo artists include Stoney St. Claire, who along with being a tattoo artist, was also a sword swallower.

tattoo Stoney St. Claire
Stoney St. Claire

Another artist was Jack Dracula, an artist most famous for working out of Coney Island. Jack was also heavily tattooed himself, and is famous for his facial tattoos, some of which he at least partially did on himself before he realized tattooing his own face would prove a too daunting task.

tattoo Jack Dracula
Jack Dracula

Charles Wagner was another famous artist responsible for tattooing over 50 people who were, or went on to be tattoo attractions. Charles worked out of New York and is also famous for patenting a tattoo machine, improving upon the new design Samuel O’Reilly had created to make tattooing faster and less painful, as well as more sterile.

tattoo Charles Wagner
Charles Wagner and a number of his clients

Samuel O’Reilly patented the first “modern” tattoo machine, and also fully tattooed up to 12 ladies in the late 1800’s.

tattoo o'reilly
O’Reilly’s machine

Many of the tattooed people were also at least part time artists themselves, giving them a chance to earn more money.

Tattooing was an extremely important part of the circus world (and still is), and is also in part responsible for how quickly tattooing became popular in North America and some parts of Europe.

 

Information taken from books:

-Circus Age : Culture and Society under the American Big Top
by Janet M. Davis

– The Life and Adventures of James F. O’Connell, the Tattooed Man by James F. O’Connell

-Twelve Days at Nuku Hiva : Russian Encounters and Mutiny in the South Pacific
by Elena Govor

-Tattooed : The Sociogenesis of a Body Art
by Michael M. Atkinson

-The Greatest Shows on Earth : A History of the Circus
by Linda Simon

and websites:

http://www.thehumanmarvels.com

http://www.vanishingtattoo.com

http://www.tattooarchive.com

 

 

Sailor Moon Tattoos:

Sailor Moon is a popular Japanese Anime show based off the 52 manga chapters entitled Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon. The show premiered in Japan in 1992 and was popular there as well as overseas.

sailor Alicia Foley
Brooch and crystals with colourful dotwork on the knee done by Alivia Foley at Artful Dodger Tattoo in Seattle.
Sailor Uls Metzger at Puro Tattoo in Italy
Dotwork mandala and brooch by Uls Metzger at Puro Tattoo in Italy.
sailor Nikko Hurtado at Black Anchor Collective in L.A
Photo realistic Sailor Moon portrait by Nikko Hurtado at Black Anchor Collective In L.A.

Sailor Moon is the heroine name of the main character, a young woman who fights evil. A cat named Luna gives Sailor Moon, or Usagi (Serena in English), a magical brooch that transforms her into Sailor Moon. Throughout the show Usagi/Serena meets other young women who are also given magical objects able to transform them. Together they form the Sailor Soldiers. Along with being able to transform, they have other items that help them to fight evil.

sailor Anunnakitattoo
Bright purple one by Laura Anunnaki.
Sailor Charlotte Ann Harris at Castle Ink Studio in Birmingham, UK
Black dotwork piece by Charlotte Ann Harris at Castle Ink Studio in Birmingham, UK.
sailor Eric Flannes
Fight like a girl! By Eric Flannes.

The show is particularly popular with young woman as it is about strong, powerful women who fight evil and are portrayed as strong and capable, but also human, capable of having human breakdowns as well as strength.The show also has themes of love triumphing over hate.

Sailor Erick Holguin at Ink and Dagger in Roswell, GA
In Japanese Sailor Moon is called Usagi which translated means bunny! Realistic piece done by Erick Holguin at Ink and Dagger in Roswell, GA.
sailor Helena Darling in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Brooch, dotwork mandala by Helena Darling in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
sailor Kimberly Wall at Black Rabbit Tattoo in Richmond, VA
Lotus and crystal thigh piece done by Kimberly Wall at Black Rabbit Tattoo in Richmond, VA.
sailor Teresa Sharpe at Unkindness Art in Richmond, VA
Neo traditional flowers, script, and brooch by Teresa Sharpe at Unkindness Art in Richmond, VA.

As a tattoo, many people get Sailor Moon or the other Sailor Soldiers, the cats Luna, Artemis, and Diana, the different magical items, and the crescent moon. These tattoos are often bright and colourful but can also be done in blackwork. Styles range from American traditional, neo traditional, realistic, new school, dotwork, blackwork, black and grey, and watercolour.

sailor Kadee Spangler at Chroma Tattoo
Luna by Kadee Spangler at Chroma Tattoo.
sailor Brando Chiesa
Bright realistic/ neo traditional Artemis by Brando Chiesa on Florence, Italy.
Sailor Brando 1
Neck Artemis with sceptre by Brando again.
sailor Brando
One more Artemis and creepy Sailor Moon by Brando once more.

Who is your favorite Sailor Moon character?

Deathly Hallows Tattoos:

The Deathly Hallows are three magical objects from the Harry Potter series that together make up a triangular design that when worn shows you are a believer. The three objects are the Elder Wand, a wand made to be unbeatable, The Resurrection Stone, which brings back the dead, and the Cloak of Invisibility which as it says, renders the user completely invisible. The cloak forms a triangle, the stone is a circle within the triangle, and the wand is a straight line within the triangle and circle.

Hallows 1
My own Hallows and quote Done by Carly Montgomery at First String Tattoo in Winnipeg.

The story of the Deathly Hallows is first told in the seventh book. In the story, Death created each of these three items, and gave them to the three Peverell brothers who had outsmarted Death by crossing a river that usually claimed lives. These items were their rewards for outsmarting him. The two eldest brothers had requested the wand and the stonem but both met grisly deaths due to the nature of their magical items. The wand caused Antioch Peverell to gloat, leading him to be killed in his sleep and have the wand stolen, while the stone caused Cadmus Peverell to take his own life after bringing his late wife back from the dead, as she was unable to be happy in the land of the living again. The youngest brother Ignotus Peverell requested Death’s own cloak, and used it to avoid him until he was ready for Death. Ignotus passed the cloak on to his son and from there greeted Death “like an old friend”. This cloak is the very same on that Harry had passed down to him.

hallows Brit Tigera
White Hallows and bright flowers by Brit Tigera.
hallows Felipe Bernardes
Watercolour background with Hallows and hand holding onto the Elder Wand by Felipe Bernardes.
hallows Fulvio Vaccarone
Neo traditional hand with Hogwarts and Hallows by Fulvio Vaccarone at Dark Ink Tattoo Studio in Italy.

Lovers of the Harry Potter series, whether the books or films, have often gotten the Deathly Hallows as a tattoo to show their love of magic. The Deathly Hallows symbol is often paired with quotes or other images such as flowers, Hogwarts, magical creatures, spells, potions, and people’s patronuses.

hallows Helena Darling, Halifax Nova Scotia
Brightly coloured Hogwarts in a globe with Hallows by Helena Darling in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
hallows Jack Peppiette
Brilliant geometric patterned back of the neck piece with Hallows by Jack Peppiette at Insider Tattoo in Edinburgh, Scotland.
hallows Mike D Old Rose Tattoo Califirnia
Hallows and American Traditional rose by Mike D. at Old Rose Tattoo in California.
hallows Nichola Pierport at Jays Inks in Lincoln UK.
Blackwork/dotwork tree’s, broomstick, wand, snitch, and Hallows by Nichola Pierport at Jays Inks in Lincoln, UK.
hallows Raul William
Golden snitch, Harry Potter, and Hallows with watercolour background by Raul Willian at Jack Tattoo.
hallows Ryan Murray at Black Veil Tattoo in Salem Ma
Mcgonagall in cat form with Hallows by Ryan Murray at Black Veil Tattoo in Salem, MA.
hallows Ryan Tews
White Hallows and bright watercolour background by Ryan Tews in Calgary, Alberta.
Hallows Twon Egypt
Blackwork Hallows and and Augrey, a magical bird creature that is tattooed on the Character Delphi from Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. Done by Twon in Egypt.

“Always” keep the magic alive!

Artist of the Month: Sergey Vaskevich

Sergey Vaskevich is a tattoo artist from Minsk, working out of Good Sign Tattoo. His work is dark traditional and neo-traditional. His work is dark both in colour, and in imagery. Often featuring devils, demons, ghosts,and occult designs, along with the occasional fetish piece.

sergey 1
Horrifying bat head.

 

He has a fantastic imagination, combining often mundane designs with a fantastic mix of death and horror.

sergey 2
Devil head and mountain range.
sergey 3
Vampiric looking ladyhead with her own great snake tattoo.
sergey 4
Knee mandala
sergey 5
Wicked throat piece of a fiery candle.
sergey 6
Beautiful harp.
sergey 7
NSFW fetish/torture piece.
sergey 8
Spooky occult piece featuring a demon hand making shadows.
sergey 9
Classic wolf head.
sergey 10
Fiery bold torch.
sergey 11
Well and ghost.
sergey 12
Classic bear head.
sergey 13
Banging elbow spider.
sergey 14
Fantastic demon head eating a naked woman.
sergey 15
Severed ladyhead with moon and crow.

Which piece is your favorite?

Winnipeg Artist 3: Jade Harper

Jade Harper is a tattoo artist at Rebel Waltz in Winnipeg, currently apprenticing under Bram Adey. Jade does mainly blackwork pieces, but has been doing more bold colourful works recently as well.

jade-bear
Bold bear and elegant script.

For a relatively new artist her portfolio is growing very quickly, as she is talented, and dedicated.

jade-cat-and-flower
Asian style cat with chrysanthemum in Japanese black and grey.

Jade has a large amount of her own tattoo flash to choose from, and she also takes ideas, and will make changes to her own flash to suit the client’s needs.

jade-cowboy-love
Healed cowboys in love.
jade-hand-and-heart
Bloody heart in hand.
jade-hot-air-balloon
Detailed line and dotwork hot air balloon.
jade-ladyhead-and-number
Classic traditional lady head and the number 27.
jade-lotus
Beautifully shaded lotus flower.
jade-mouse-detective
Roquefort the mouse from Disney’s The Aristocats.
jade-naked-lady
Naked woman and dragon in Japanese black and grey.
jade-noose
My own “hang in there” noose from Jade.
jade-playboy
Bold playboy bunny.
jade-red-peony
Some bright flowers on the forearm.

Jade is a must-see up and coming artist in Winnipeg if you’re passing through, or a local looking for someone great!

 

Goddess Kali Tattoos:

Kali is a Hindu goddess often misconstrued as a goddess of death. While she does bring about the death of the ego and demons, she does not kill humans. She is the counterpart of the more violent deity Shiva the destroyer, both of whom are the destroyers of unreality. Kali is depicted as a woman with a garland of skulls or heads, and dismembered arms, because the ego arises out of identification with the body. She also is usually seen with black or dark blue skin, which symbolizes the womb of which all creation arises and into which all creation will eventually dissolve into. So she is often mistaken as a fearsome deity, she is actually a motherly figure.

As a tattoo Kali is often done in American traditional style, neo-traditional, black and grey, or realism.

kali-aaron-riddle
Neo-traditional Kali by Aaron Riddle at Black Lotus Tattooers in Phoenix, Arizona.
kali-andrew-strychnine
American traditional, less angry Kali by Andrew Strychnine at Redrum Tattoo Collective in Moscow.
kali-dan-molloy
Unfinished black and grey Kali back piece by Dan Molloy in Perth, Australia.
kali-joe-ellis
Mostly black Kali by Joe Ellis at Sacred Electric Custom Tattooing in Leeds, UK.
kali-natalya-litvinenko
Full colourful Kali back piece by Natalia Litvinenko.
kali-philip-yarnell
Dark American traditional Kali head by Philip Yarnell at Skynyard Tattoos, UK.
kali-steven-huie
Full bodied version of Kali by Steven Huie at Flyrite Tattoo.
kali-tom-caine
Another unfinished Kali back piece by Tom Caine at Holy mountain Tattoo, UK.
kali-andrew-fyfe-at-main-street-tattoo-collectivve
Full rib panel Kali head by Andrew Fyfe at Main Street Tattoo Collective in Winnipeg, Manitoba.
kali-lucy-at-into-you-tattoo-piercing
A much more motherly version of Kali by Lucy Pryor at Into You Tattoo & Piercing in London, UK.

Winnipeg Artists 2: Reuben Todd

Reuben is a tattoo artist working out of Kapala Tattoo in Winnipeg. His main styles are American traditional and Japanese. Along with tattooing, Reuben also paints; mainly Japanese inspired images.

Reuben has years of experience under his belt and is a pleasure to be tattooed by. Even while tattooing my stomach which is quite a tender area, he was able to take my mind off the pain with conversation.

reuben-6
My own blackwork American traditional stomach piece.
reuben-1
Blackwork American traditional clasped hands and dagger with flowers.
reuben-2
Peter Pan inspired piece with pan flute and script.
reuben-3
Blue traditional rose.
reuben-7
Matching knee ditch Halloween pieces. A witch and Casper the friendly ghost.

 

Reuben has been doing larger pieces recently including half and full sleeves. His American traditional pieces are reminiscent of the old days, but have a twist of newer style, particularly while tattooing lady heads.

reuben-9
Ladyhead with apple and different coloured eyes based on his clients photo.
reuben-10
Large healed ladyhead with new traditional wolf below.

His Japanese work is bold, often featuring waves or flowers, which really make the main center piece of the tattoo pop. His Japanese work is generally done large in a arm or leg sleeve.

reuben-4
Japanese dragon 3/4 sleeve with fire.
reuben-5
Full Japanese leg sleeve with koi, waves, and leaves.
reuben-8
Japanese snake sleeve with waves.

Reuben is a must see artist for your traditional or Japanese tattoo needs.

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